… according to Pivot Legal Society, hostile design does more than just shoo homeless people away, it engenders a city-wide atmosphere of exclusion, driving Vancouver’s most vulnerable off the street into the city’s parks.

Not only does defensive design reinforce negative stigma, but it pushes homeless individuals to set up “informal tent city structures,” where people feel a greater sense of security and community, says Meenakshi Mannoe, a community educator.

According to data released June 12, approximately 2,223 homeless people were living in Vancouver this past March, including 614 without a shelter.

We’re now 10 years on from the biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression. Or, as our national mythology puts it, 10 years since Canada breathed a deep sigh of relief as the crisis mostly grazed our economy and financial system.

Since 2008, we’ve had 10 years of congratulatory back-patting over our system of financial regulation, 10 years of low inflation and low interest rates, 10 years of periodically oil-driven economic growth—and 10 years of exploding housing prices, of renovictions and demovictions, of working people pushed out of some cities and a real estate investment bonanza for the homegrown and foreign rich.

The inquiry’s commissioners gathered testimony from more than 2,300 people, survivors of violence and family members of women who were murdered or went missing, across the country for two years. The “inescapable conclusion” is that Indigenous women, girls, and LGBTQ people have experienced genocide, the final report said.

One of the report’s “calls for justice,” or recommendations, is that Canada establish a guaranteed annual liveable income, sometimes called basic income or minimum income, for everyone in the country.

A cross-party group of MPs, flanked by organizations that help veterans in need, made a plea on the eve of the 75th anniversary of D-Day for the government to end veteran homelessness and create a special housing stipend as a key first step.

The motion from Ontario Liberal MP Neil Ellis asks his own government to create a subsidy similar to one in the United States that’s credited with helping to cut in half the number of homeless American veterans and could get thousands of veterans off Canadian streets.

Veterans Affairs Canada recommended something similar in early drafts of its strategy for helping homeless vets, noting that a rent-assistance program would help veterans quickly find permanent housing wherever they live.

Food insecurity in Nunavut has gotten worse since the introduction of the Nutrition North program in 2011, according to a study published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

The study, published by researchers from the University of Toronto, determined 46 per cent of households in Nunavut were experiencing food insecurity in 2016, up from 33.1 per cent in 2011, when Nutrition North was introduced.

Nutrition North is a federal government subsidy program provided to retailers and suppliers that offsets the cost of a variety of perishable and nutritious food items shipped to the North by air.

The study raises questions about the effectiveness of Nutrition North, though it doesn’t conclude the program is at fault.

To give or not to give? That’s the question many of us struggle with as we see a person holding a cardboard sign at freeway exits or along busy pedestrian malls.

What if the person buys drugs or alcohol with it instead of food? Is that even a fair question? We asked three Twin Cities region advocates for ending homelessness to guide us when faced with a person who asks for money in public.

On May 23, the seventh annual Tommy Douglas Institute at George Brown College welcomes activist, author and Council of Canadians National Chairperson Maude Barlow as its keynote speaker on Poverty, Populism, Planet: Envisioning Economic Justice.

Nearly two decades into the 21st century we are witness to a number of unsettling realities.

In an unprecedented display of wealth inequality, 26 of the world’s richest individuals own and control as much as the bottom 50 per cent of the global population. Billionaires grow their fortunes at an accumulated rate of $2.5 billion a day, while wealth and opportunity are siphoned from everywhere else; leading to growing rates of poverty, precarity and a raft of social insecurities for so many others (in employment, shelter, health care, education, and the list is increasing).