We’re now 10 years on from the biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression. Or, as our national mythology puts it, 10 years since Canada breathed a deep sigh of relief as the crisis mostly grazed our economy and financial system.

Ten years after the crisis, many Canadian cities are still in crisis. What follows is a look at the contours and roots of our urban housing crisis, and some avenues for exiting it in a way that would benefit the majority of people.

While premiers and territorial leaders meet in Saskatchewan today to discuss the well-being of Indigenous children, youth and families, a new report released today co-authored by the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) says First Nations children experience the highest levels of poverty in Canada.

“Canada is not tracking First Nations poverty on-reserve so we did,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “The findings of this report are shameful and underscore the urgent need to invest in First Nations children, families and communities. Our children face the worst social and economic conditions in the country. They deserve an opportunity to succeed. Canada has not been tracking poverty on-reserve and that’s one reason the situation is not improving. We need a combination of political will, action, cooperation among governments and sustainable investments in water, infrastructure, housing and education to help First Nations children succeed and get a fair start in life. It’s beneficial to all Canadians to close the gap in quality of life between First Nations and Canada.”

I am happy to see Basic Income Guarantee being discussed again. Premier Dennis King and MLA Ernie Hudson (Minister of Social Development and Housing) said there will not be funding to study this issue. I agree that it needs no funding for study. It has been studied and if it is implemented here, it can follow the plan which the Liberals put into action in Ontario. Secure Income will be implemented without study is what I understood from The Guardian article on July 3rd. In many letters, I have said and again, the four Liberal MP’s should hang their heads for not leading the way for a provincial pilot project of Basic Income Guarantee.

Behind Government House in Fredericton, Donald McLeod is busy making sure residents living in tents are safe.

“I’m safe and I make sure the girls are safe. … As long as I’m around, nothing’s going to happen.”

Although he doesn’t think the living conditions of this tent city are too bad, McLeod said another year-round shelter is needed for the city’s homeless.

… according to Pivot Legal Society, hostile design does more than just shoo homeless people away, it engenders a city-wide atmosphere of exclusion, driving Vancouver’s most vulnerable off the street into the city’s parks.

Not only does defensive design reinforce negative stigma, but it pushes homeless individuals to set up “informal tent city structures,” where people feel a greater sense of security and community, says Meenakshi Mannoe, a community educator.

According to data released June 12, approximately 2,223 homeless people were living in Vancouver this past March, including 614 without a shelter.

We’re now 10 years on from the biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression. Or, as our national mythology puts it, 10 years since Canada breathed a deep sigh of relief as the crisis mostly grazed our economy and financial system.

Since 2008, we’ve had 10 years of congratulatory back-patting over our system of financial regulation, 10 years of low inflation and low interest rates, 10 years of periodically oil-driven economic growth—and 10 years of exploding housing prices, of renovictions and demovictions, of working people pushed out of some cities and a real estate investment bonanza for the homegrown and foreign rich.

P.E.I.’s new Progressive Conservative minority government says it wants to introduce a new social assistance pilot program within the next six months.

Among the many priorities outlined’s in Friday’s Throne Speech was a commitment to implement a Secure Income Program Pilot.

“It’s to provide a basic level of income, if you like, that will be means-tested. But to provide for the essential needs of Islanders right across the board,” said Minister of Social Development and Housing Ernie Hudson.