Finland’s basic income scheme did not spur its unemployed recipients to work more to supplement their earnings as hoped but it did help their wellbeing, researchers said on Friday as the government announced initial findings.

The two-year trial, which ended a month ago, saw 2,000 Finns, chosen randomly from among the unemployed, become the first Europeans to be paid a regular monthly income by the state that was not reduced if they found work.

The trial was being watched closely by other governments who see a basic income as a way of encouraging the unemployed to take up often low-paid or temporary work without fear of losing their benefits. That could help reduce dependence on the state and cut welfare costs, especially as greater automation sees humans replaced in the workforce.

Giving jobless people in Finland a basic income for two years did not lead them to find work, researchers said.

The aim was to see if a guaranteed safety net would help people find jobs, and support them if they had to take insecure gig economy work.

While employment levels did not improve, participants said they felt happier and less stressed.

“As a society, hidden homelessness is not considered to be homelessness,” William O’Grady, a sociology professor at the University of Guelph, told Out in the Open.

“Images of homelessness, which appear in the Canadian mass media, for example, usually depict ‘the homeless’ as people living on the streets in large cities like Toronto and Vancouver.”

He added that people living with hidden homelessness may not consider themselves to be homeless, and therefore don’t seek support that may be available — essentially making them “invisible to the service system.”

The federal government is planning to spend an additional $114.7 million to compensate provinces and municipalities for temporary housing costs for asylum seekers.

The money is part of $2.5 billion in new spending plans tabled late Monday as part of the government’s supplementary estimates.

The financial document says the influx of irregular migrants entering Canada has increased pressure on provinces to provide shelter and social services.

The federal government is giving Toronto $15 million to help address mounting demand on the city’s shelter system as it faces the added pressures of refugee claimants. It’s the latest injection of funding since Ottawa committed $11 million last summer.

In a news release Friday, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada acknowledged that while affordable temporary housing has been a “key challenge in Toronto for some time,” the impacts of global migration have placed the system under greater strain over the past year.

The release went on to say that provincial governments are still “best placed” to distribute funding for housing pressures and wants to see a cost-sharing agreement with Ontario to help tackle the pressures on the system.

UNICEF’s 2017 Index of Child and Youth Well-being and Sustainability. A recent national study from Children First Canada also reports that suicide is the second leading cause of death among Canadian children. Mental-health related hospitalization rates are increasing and approximately one in five Canadian kids continue to live in poverty.

The reality is more bleak when you consider First Nations children.

One in three Indigenous children live in poverty. This number rises to over 60% among children living on reserve. First Nations youth have suicide rates five to seven times higher than non-Indigenous youth – and Inuit youth have one of the highest rates in the world, 11 times higher than the national average.